Command of the Day: cat

What a great name for a tool. Funny enough, there is a dog command, but it’s not installed by default. The original cat came with Unix version 1 in November 1971, and it replaced an older command called pr. Believe it or not, chances are, the pr command is on your machine today! That’s a new one on me. The pr command has a different output format than cat, making it a bit “prettier” because it offers a pagination filter. Anyway, back to cat
/usr/bin/cat ⏎ 

Command of the Day: sort

Probably should have done this in opposite order, as a precursor to the uniq command. But who cares. If you’ve follwed yesterday’s post, then you’ve had some exposure to the sort command. Let’s dive into it and get some more use out of it!
/usr/bin/cat ⏎ 

Command of the Day: uniq

Finding uniquiness in a list! Remove duplicates, print duplicated, show only duplicates…the possibilities are endless! Well, actually there is a finite number of posibilities, but that involves combinatorics. And I’m too lazy for that right now. Anyway… uniq is pretty slick. Check it out!
/usr/bin/cat ⏎ 

Command of the Day: tail

If you saw yesterday’s Command of the Day about head then you prolly saw this coming.
/usr/bin/cat ⏎ 

Command of the Day: head

I think it’s safe to say that head was one of the first Unix commands I learned. Definitely up there with cd, ls, and rm. Although, I find myself using its converse utility tail much more often, digging into this reminded me how useful the head command actually is. Even if you’ve used this a million times before, I hope you can gain something out of this.
/usr/bin/cat ⏎ 

Command of the Day: wc

The wc command (or word-count), is another one of those gems that I find myself using more often in scripts than I expect. The initial release was in November of ‘71 (48 years ago!) and a release has been part of the Free Software Foundation since 1985. Perhaps even more amazing, is that it continues to be developed today! At this time of writing wc has had three commits directly related to it within the past year.
/usr/bin/cat ⏎ 

Command of the Day: true and false

Thought about doing this as two separate blog posts, but soon realized it would probably be the same post twice. As a software engineer, I deal with boolean values everyday. But never really thought about having boolean programs. Also, why would you want to make them into an entire program?
/usr/bin/cat ⏎ 

Command of the Day: yes

I wanted to start out this series with a command that’s included in the coreutils that I don’t think enough people utilize (or probably know about). Yes, the yes command.
/usr/bin/cat ⏎